Summer Reading Recommendations for Kids by age

July 04, 2019

Summer Reading Recommendations for Kids by age

School is out for summer! It’s a time for more unstructured playtime and creativity. Dive headfirst into your imagination  with fun and a stack of books!
Here are the top picks from our readers for each age from 3-12 years old.
Face it,  we're pretty lazy sometimes and struggle to do all the good things we know we should do. That's why it's important to make reading a regular part of your child's daily schedule. Cuddle up with a few books right before nap, and again before bedtime. Make reading a family ritual and your child will grow up yearning for another good story. 
​We use Amazon's FreeTime Unlimited is an all-in-one subscription that gives kids access to thousands of kid-friendly books, movies, TV shows, educational apps, and games on compatible Fire, Android, iOS and Kindle devices.

​Children's Books Ages 3-5: 

​Age 3

Dr. Seuss’s wonderfully wise Oh, the Places You'll Go!is the perfect send-off for grads—from nursery school, high school, college, and beyond! 


From soaring to high heights and seeing great sights to being left in a Lurch on a prickle-ly perch, Dr. Seuss addresses life’s ups and downs with his trademark humorous verse and illustrations, while encouraging readers to find the success that lies within. In a starred review, Booklist notes, “Seuss’s message is simple but never sappy: life may be a ‘Great Balancing Act,’ but through it all ‘There’s fun to be done.’” A perennial favorite and a perfect gift for anyone starting a new phase in their life!

​Age 4

In a great green room, tucked away in bed, is a little bunny. "Goodnight room, goodnight moon." And to all the familiar things in the softly lit room—to the picture of the three little bears sitting on chairs, to the clocks and his socks, to the mittens and the kittens, to everything one by one—the little bunny says goodnight.
In this classic of children's literature, beloved by generations of readers and listeners, the quiet poetry of the words and the gentle, lulling illustrations combine to make a perfect book for the end of the day.
This board book edition is the perfect size for little hands.

​Age 5

The Day the Crayons Quit 
The hilarious, colorful #1 New York Times bestselling phenomenon that every kid wants! 
Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: His crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking—each believes he is the true color of the sun.
What can Duncan possibly do to appease all of the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?
Kids will be imagining their own humorous conversations with crayons and coloring a blue streak after sharing laughs with Drew Daywalt and New York Times bestseller Oliver Jeffers. This story is perfect as a back-to-school gift, for all budding artists and for fans of humorous books.

​Children's Books Ages 6-8: 

​​Age 6

The Wild Robot Escapes
Shipwrecked on a remote, wild island, Robot Roz learned from the unwelcoming animal inhabitants and adapted to her surroundings--but can she survive the challenges of the civilized world and find her way home to Brightbill and the island?

From bestselling and award-winning author and illustrator Peter Brown comes a heartwarming and action-packed sequel to his New York Times bestselling The Wild Robot, about what happens when nature and technology collide.

​​Age 7

The Bad Guys in Alien vs Bad Guys (The Bad Guys #6)
My 7 year old thinks, "this book is really funny." It's the first book that he really dove into and could stop laughing out-loud. 
The Bad Guys are vanishing! A creature with TONS of teeth and WAY too many butts is stealing them, one by one. Is this the end for the Bad Guys? Maybe. Will it be funny? You bet your butts it will!

​​​Age 8

The Word Collector
Some people collect stamps.
Some people collect coins.
Some people collect art.
And Jerome?
Jerome collected words . . .


In this extraordinary new tale from Peter H. Reynolds, Jerome discovers the magic of the words all around him -- short and sweet words, two-syllable treats, and multisyllable words that sound like little songs. Words that connect, transform, and empower. 

From the creator of The Dot and Happy Dreamer comes a celebration of finding your own words -- and the impact you can have when you share them with the world.

​Children's Books Ages 9-12: 

​​​Age 9

Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard, Book 1: The Sword of Summer
Magnus Chase has always been a troubled kid. Since his mother's mysterious death, he's lived alone on the streets of Boston, surviving by his wits, keeping one step ahead of the police and the truant officers.

One day, he's tracked down by an uncle he barely knows-a man his mother claimed was dangerous. Uncle Randolph tells him an impossible secret: Magnus is the son of a Norse god.
The Viking myths are true. The gods of Asgard are preparing for war. Trolls, giants and worse monsters are stirring for doomsday. To prevent Ragnarok, Magnus must search the Nine Worlds for a weapon that has been lost for thousands of years.

When an attack by fire giants forces him to choose between his own safety and the lives of hundreds of innocents, Magnus makes a fatal decision.

​​​​Age 10

The Trials of Apollo Book Three The Burning Maze
The formerly glorious god Apollo, cast down to earth in punishment by Zeus, is now an awkward mortal teenager named Lester Papadopoulos. In order to regain his place on Mount Olympus, Lester must restore five Oracles that have gone dark. But he has to achieve this impossible task without having any godly powers and while being duty-bound to a confounding young daughter of Demeter named Meg. Thanks a lot, Dad.
With the help of some demigod friends, Lester managed to survive his first two trials, one at Camp Half-Blood, and one in Indianapolis, where Meg received the Dark Prophecy. The words she uttered while seated on the Throne of Memory revealed that an evil triumvirate of Roman emperors plans to attack Camp Jupiter. While Leo flies ahead on Festus to warn the Roman camp, Lester and Meg must go through the Labyrinth to find the third emperor--and an Oracle who speaks in word puzzles--somewhere in the American Southwest. There is one glimmer of hope in the gloom-filled prophecy: The cloven guide alone the way does know. They will have a satyr companion, and Meg knows just who to call upon. . . .

​​​​Age 12

The Girl Who Drank the Moon
Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest. They hope this sacrifice will keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the Forest, Xan, is kind. She shares her home with a wise Swamp Monster and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon. Xan rescues the children and delivers them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest, nourishing the babies with starlight on the journey.

One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. Xan decides she must raise this girl, whom she calls Luna, as her own. As Luna’s thirteenth birthday approaches, her magic begins to emerge--with dangerous consequences. Meanwhile, a young man from the Protectorate is determined to free his people by killing the witch. Deadly birds with uncertain intentions flock nearby. A volcano, quiet for centuries, rumbles just beneath the earth’s surface. And the woman with the Tiger’s heart is on the prowl . . .
Your young child will love snuggling on your lap with a good story. But even if your child has outgrown your lap doesn't mean they've outgrown the need for you to read. Continue the reading tradition long after they can read for themselves. 
Read more challenging, longer chapter books that are beyond your child's reading level.  Whatever else you do, always keep in mind that you're planting a "reading seed" with every single book you read.
P.S.
My kids have the 
 Amazon Fire HD 8 Tablet  $49.99 (@ time of post)
We also subscribe to FreeTime Unlimited $2.99 per month (@ time of post)
Of course there is always Audible which you can get a 30-day Free Trial
They can read unlimited books. This is well worth it because they can do soooo much with it and we as parents have ultimate control in the settings. I can hand it to them without worry. I also like that I can set the parameters for playing a game. For example 30 minutes of reading to unlock any games.
I hope that helps.


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