Getting Back Into a School Routine

July 04, 2019

Getting Back Into a School Routine

This is a vital time.  This is the time to set the tone for the school year and instill good habits for yourself and your young ones. This is the time to teach your children about the importance of following a daily routine. Here are four things to think about when creating your daily routine or task list.
Ever noticed how first day of school photos are abundant, but no one shares photos from the eighth day of school on Facebook? I’m sure we all know why. By the end of that second week of school, the exhaustion has set in, and the “newness” has started to fade. You may have had to visit your child’s room two or three times to get him out of bed this morning. And wait . . . where is his homework?

Parents, this is a vital time.  This is the time to set the tone for the school year and instill good habits for yourself and your young ones. This is the time to teach your children about the importance of following a daily routine. Here are four things to think about when creating your daily routine or task list.

Communicate your routine with your children

Write out a schedule for your child, especially if attending school is new to them. Your child may not know what to expect out of school, and showing them a plan might help alleviate some of their anxiety about starting a new venture. Your morning schedule might include such things as make your bed, go to the bathroom, put on your clothes, brush your hair, eat breakfast, and brush your teeth. 

Provide necessary structure for your children

To make mornings run as smoothly as possible, make sure everything has a place. Show them where to keep the next day’s outfit that they will pick out the evening before school. Show them where to keep their toothbrush and comb. Have a spot for backpacks and lunch bags. Show them where to keep their shoes. Kids are used to structure at school, and it probably wouldn’t phase them to have some of it spread into their lives at home. 

Hold your children accountable

Check to see that morning tasks really get done. If your child leaves the house in the morning without making her bed, have her make it when she gets home from school. You can do it without nagging or scolding. Just be matter of fact about how that is part of your expectations for them in the morning, and they can enjoy free time as soon as that task is done.

Be a good example

If you want your children to make their beds, then you need to make yours as well. If you want your child to keep their important papers in their backpacks, then don’t have piles of paper on your kitchen counter. If you want your child to go to bed earlier, make sure you are going to bed early enough so that you can be awake and functional in the morning.
You are not alone! There are tons of great parenting resources to help you teach your children to be responsible members of your household. For example, did you know that we created a magnetic task list? It’s easy to use and works great for kids four years and older.
You’re too busy in the morning to ask each of your children if they have completed everything on their task list. Take a quick look at their chart to determine who still needs to brush their teeth and who still needs to make their lunch. Using your task list will help your morning run smoothly. Visit our store to learn more.


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